Biya Fires 20 Police Officers for abandoning duty posts

20 Police officers have been laid off by the Head of State, President Paul Biya for abandoning their duty posts.

It is becoming the new normal in Cameroon for authorities of the civil service to abandon their jobs for officially unknown reasons. At the national security especially, there has been growing concerns over the responsibility of the police at their duty post. It is either the police is heavily involved in fraudulent activities or not at involved in any of its duties.

During the past few months, the president has signed decrees laying off over 20 police officers for abandoning their duty post in favour of their personal businesses, while receiving salaries. Many of these police officers especially gave up on the war front in the North West and South West regions, others left for better paying jobs and more.
Some of the dismissed police officers include; Mr. Mbezele Ekodo Arsene, a 2nd grade peace keeper. He was laid off by the President of the Republic for abandoning his duty post between March and July 2018; Mr Bruno Tarkangmone Eno, sacked for job abandonment, reported on April 2019; Mr. Lokoti Aubin, 2nd grade peacekeeper, sacked for job abandonment, reported on September 2018 and Tagni Tchio Romain Platini amongst a long list.

It is increasingly reoccurring for dozens of names of civil servants to be called out on national station to return to their duties. The overly centralised system of the country has been of little help in effectively checking civil service employee performance. Transfers who go unchecked usually tend to abscond for long periods while receiving salaries for work not being done.

Some civil servants could go for years of inactivity at duty post in Cameroon, while effectively receiving their salaries, to the detriment of the civilian population that may be in need of the unavailable services that could have been possibly rendered by the absentees.

©Mimi Mefo Info

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